CAREERSONLINE IT DEGREEONLINE COLLEGE DEGREESCOLLEGESJOBSARTICLES

Nuclear Engineer


How to Become a Nuclear Engineer
Nuclear Engineer Job Description
Skills and Qualities of a Nuclear Engineer
Salaries of Nuclear Engineers
Influential Professional Nuclear Engineers
Leading Organizations for Nuclear Engineers
Top Cities for Nuclear Engineer Jobs
Other Careers of Interest

How to become a Nuclear Engineer

Considerable preparation is needed for candidates going into this field. Most entry-level nuclear engineering jobs require a bachelor's degree, concentrating in an engineering specialty with basic classes on physical and life sciences as well as mathematics. Various research positions require a graduate's degree while direct servicing to the public requires licensing. Attending a 2- or 4-year technology program may produce similar jobs that one could attain with a bachelor's degree in engineering. Focus in this program is on current applications in engineering principles rather than theoretical or scientific knowledge. Qualification as a professional engineer, however, is only given to graduates with a bachelor's degree in engineering.

Typical United States training necessitates college preparation for mathematics training in calculus, physics, and chemistry. Undergraduate work includes groundwork in the mechanics and dynamics of particle motion, thermodynamics, computer programming, college-level physics and chemistry, and differential training. Specialization study happens midway through undergraduate school. Fluid mechanics, reactor mechanics, quantum mechanics, thermal hydraulics, linear circuits, radiation effects, and neutron transport are just some classes one can expect in upper class work.

Engineers derive economical solutions to technical problems by applying scientific and mathematical principles. Scientific discoveries and commercial applications meet societal and consumer needs through maintaining constant technical literacy in the new and upcoming technological trends and applications, making continuing education critical to this field.

What does a Nuclear Engineer do?

Nuclear engineers do a number of tasks, some of which include: research on nuclear engineering problems; application of nuclear scientific theoretical principles to potential problems associated with the release, control, and utilization of nuclear waste; accident examination to obtain data further utilized in designing preventative measures; management of nuclear facility operations to locate any violation of safety regulations and laws that can potentially jeopardize operational safety through the identification of inappropriate design, construction, or operation practices; review of technical journals, independent study and research; experiments, providing information about acceptable methods of nuclear material usage and nuclear fuel reclamation systems; and the design and development of nuclear equipment, such as reactor cores, radiation shielding, and related instrumentation and control mechanisms. Engineers initiate corrective action or order plant shutdowns in emergency situations and recommend preventative measures, handling nuclear technology based on data obtained from operations monitoring or the evaluation of test results. Engineers author operational instructions used in nuclear plant operation as well as nuclear fuel and waste handling disposal, tests of nuclear fuel behavior and cycles, and performance of nuclear machinery and equipment are conducted, optimizing the performance of existing plants.

What skills or qualities do I need to become a Nuclear Engineer?

Candidates are active listeners and critical thinkers. They perform quality control analysis; participate in judgment and decision-making calls, operation monitoring, and time management; learn strategies and troubleshoot; and are coordinated and have a high level of reading comprehension.

Nuclear engineers have excellent problem sensitivity and know when there is or there may be a problem. It is important to have written and oral comprehension as well as expression skills. Ideas presented written or orally need to be understand from the exchanger and the receiver of information. Applications of general rules to provide sensible answers to specific problems are necessary outcomes of deductive and inductive reasoning. Combining pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (finding a relation within seemingly unrelated events) is another quality trait needed. Speech clarity and speech recognition are important for communication. Information ordering - the arranging of things or actions in a certain order according to a specific rule or set of rules - is also vital to a nuclear engineer's skill set.

How much does a Nuclear Engineer make?

Pay varies on where one is geographically located. The median income that one will make, based from May 2007 reports from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, is $90,220. On average, it will be somewhere between $77, 920 and $105,710. The top 10% make about $124,510 while the lowest 10% make $65,220. People with just a bachelor's degree make, on average, $56,587. For one that has a Master's degree, starting pay is at $59,167.


Who are some influential professionals in this field?

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) is a well-known, well-respected professional non-profit organization, representing the international, scientific, and educational organization for the diverse nuclear science and technology fields. Two such recognized nuclear engineers who have received the Henry DeWolf Smyth Nuclear Statesman Award are Dr. Nils Diaz in 2008 and Edward McGaffigan, Jr.

Dr. Diaz, the former Commissioner and Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was recognized for his leadership role in the management and regulation of nuclear power technologies, and he was instrumental in dealing with the licensing of nuclear power plants as well as the implementation of new power plant licensing and guidance through many important milestones within the nuclear power industry.

McGaffigan, the current NRC commissioner, was awarded for enhancing licensees' security, and he restructured the commission's processes to increase efficiency and effectiveness as the nuclear resurgence unfolds. McGaffigan is the longest standing NRC commissioner in history and was honored with their highest honor, the Distinguished Service Award, in 2006.

What are some leading organizations in this field?

Two leading organizations in this field are the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the U.S. Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The NEA is an international organization of industrialized countries, working as a specialized agency within the Organization for Economic Co-operations and Development (OECD). As stated by the NEA, their mission is to "to assist member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for the safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes." The NEI states their mission as being " . . . a policy organization of the nuclear energy and technologies industry and participates in both the national and global policy-making process . . . to ensure the formation of policies that promote the beneficial uses of nuclear energy and technologies in the United States and around the world."

What are the top cities for Nuclear Engineer jobs?

Based on the U.S. Labor Statistics of May 2007, Arizona, Virginia, Washington, South Carolina, and Tennessee have the highest concentration of engineers while Nevada, Colorado, Tennessee, New Mexico, and Maryland pay the highest salaries to engineers.

Other Careers of Interest

Aerospace Engineer
Although the tile of "engineer" can seem to be quite technical and specific, there are many areas of engineering; some of these areas are very different...

Chemical Engineer
Although the tile of "engineer" can seem to be quite technical and specific, there are many areas of engineering; some of these areas are very different...

Civil Engineer
Although the tile of "engineer" can seem to be quite technical and specific, there are many areas of engineering; some of these areas are very different...

Electrical Engineer
Although the tile of "engineer" can seem to be quite technical and specific, there are many areas of engineering; some of these areas are very different...

Electronics Engineer
Although the tile of "engineer" can seem to be quite technical and specific, there are many areas of engineering; some of these areas are very different...

Engineer
Although the tile of "engineer" can seem to be quite technical and specific, there are many areas of engineering; some of these areas are very different...

Environmental Engineer
Although the tile of "engineer" can seem to be quite technical and specific, there are many areas of engineering; some of these areas are very different...

Industrial Engineer
Industrial Engineers employ scientific and mathematical principles to solve technical problems. In essence, an Industrial Engineer effectively determines...

Mechanical Engineer
Mechanical engineers are involved in the processes of researching and designing, developing, fabrication and verification of machines, various types...

Mining Engineer
Mining engineers can perform a variety of tasks. The first place you might find a mining engineer is near a prospective mine. A mining engineer...

Structural Engineer
Structural engineers analyze, design, plan, and research structural components and the systems that those components make up. While their work normally...

Transportation Engineer
There are several aspects to this job. For example, there is the planning side of transport engineering as it relates to urban planning, technical...



Nuclear Engineering Jobs


Browse by Location | Browse by Career

Articles

More...

Career & College Resources


unsubscribe



Creative Commons License